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Blog

This blog started as a way for me to share my recipes + culinary adventures, tips for vibrant health + happiness, thoughts on the latest developments in nutritional medicine + the low down on the Sydney wholefoods scene and beyond...

Filtering by Tag: probiotics

Potato salad with home-made mayonnaise

Becca Crawford

 

Cooked and cooled potatoes are an excellent source of resistant starch, a prebiotic that helps feed the probiotics (good bacteria) in our gut. Potato salad is one easy and yummy way to incorporate cooked and cooled potatoes into your diet. It readily lends itself for school or work lunches, eaten straight from the fridge as leftovers or prepared ahead of time for every day dinners, dinner parties or picnic lunches.

Ingredients:

  • 1 potato, cut into 1cm cubes (approx 150g)
  • ½ carrot, cut lengthways then into rounds
  • ¼ cup peas (you can buy frozen organic peas in most organic shops)
  • 1-2 rashes of pastured bacon or rounds of diced pastured ham (optional)
  • tallow (or natural fat of choice) for frying bacon
  • 1-2 tablespoons home made mayonnaise (see recipe below)
  • unrefined salt
  • cracked pepper

Directions:

Steam potato, carrots and peas until soft. Add to a bowl.

Meanwhile, dice bacon and stir fry in a small saucepan in tallow (or fat of choice) until cooked. Add to the bowl. If using ham instead of bacon add it to the bowl.

Mix ingredients in bowl to combine.

Refrigerate for 24 hours to allow resistant starch properties of the cooked and cooled potatoes to form. When ready to consume, stir through mayonnaise and season with any additional salt and pepper.

Serves 1-2 depending if consuming as a side or a main.

Note: I tend not to peel the skin on potatoes unless they are particularly grubby / full of soil. This typically depends on the variety of the potato. Sometimes a little scrub with a brush and water is enough to remove excess dirt.

Mayonnaise

Ingredients:

  • 3 egg yolks
  • 1 tsp Dijon style mustard
  • 1.5 tbsps lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp whey (optional)
  • 1/8 tsp unrefined salt
  • cracked pepper
  • ¾ cup olive oil

Directions:

Blend together all ingredients, other than the olive oil, with a hand held blender. With the blender still running, very slowly pour in the olive oil a little at a time. The result should be a thick creamy paste.

Makes 1 cup. Keep refrigerated.

Note: Without the whey, mayonnaise will keep for about 2 weeks. The addition of whey will help your mayonnaise last longer, adds enzymes and increases nutrient content. With the whey, mayonnaise keeps for several weeks in the fridge and will become firmer with time.

 

Lacto-Fermentation Workshops: Sunday 8th Feb & 22nd Feb 2015 9am-1pm

Becca Crawford

The warmer weather readily lends itself to the art of fermentation- where time and temperature work magic to populate food and drinks with live enzymes and probiotics (friendly bacteria) essential for robust and vibrant health. I will be running 2 identical half-day workshops limited to 10 people each on Sunday 8th Feb and Sunday 22 Feb.

At each of these workshops I will be showcasing how to make the following:

  • sauerkraut (cultured/fermented cabbage)
  • pickles (cultured/fermented cucumbers)
  • kefir (dairy)
  • kefir (coconut water)
  • kefir (water)
  • cultured cream
  • cream cheese
  • beet kvass
  • kombucha

Cost is $140 per person and includes:

  • detailed theory discussion on gut health, the role of friendly bacteria and probiotic-rich foods, and the factors that affect our gut microbiome and loads more!
  • detailed handout including theory, step by step guides & recipes
  • practical demonstrations
  • hands-on experience
  • food tasting
  • 1 x vegetable press (holding approx 1.5kg vegetable matter)
  • 1 x  kombucha scoby
  • 1 x packet of Natures Goodness Turkish yogurt probiotics
  • water kefir bacteria/’grains’
  • opportunity to ask questions

This workshop is ideal for:

  • those who are interested in making or perfecting their own home-made fermented foods and drinks
  • those who suffer, or have family members who suffer, from low immunity (eg frequent colds, infections) or gut/digestive issues (including skin conditions)
  • those who want to take their health and well-being to the next level with the introduction of fermented foods
  • those who want to try new things!

Where: 23 Kent Street, Waverley, 2024.

 When: Sunday 8th Feb 9am- 1pm ish OR Sunday  22 Feb 9am- 1pm ish

Spaces limited to 10 in each class. Spots typically book out within 24 hours so get in quick! If both these classes book out I will run additional classes in March.

RSVP:  To secure your spot  you will need to:

1. Text me on 0407 871 884 to confirm WHICH of the 2 classes you prefer to book into and I will confirm whether there are spaces available in that class. Spots can only be reserved for 24 hours; and
2. Once I confirm that there is a spot available please transfer $140 (referencing your name and ‘LF workshop’) within 24 hours to secure your spot into this bank account:

Account name: Star Anise Organic Wholefoods (Aust.) Pty. Ltd. 

Spanish Omelette (Tortilla Espanola)

Becca Crawford

Cooked and cooled potatoes are an excellent source of resistant starch, a prebiotic that helps feed the probiotics (good bacteria) in our gut. To learn more about resistant starch, and why you should consume it, read my blog post here. Spanish omelette is one easy and yummy way to incorporate cooked and cooled potatoes into your diet.

It is a typical Spanish dish consisting of egg omelette with potatoes. In my creation I’ve added black pudding or chorizo for extra nutrient-density and some cherry tomatoes and parsley for colour. I like to serve this dish cold to take advantage of the resistant starch properties of cooked and cooled potatoes. It readily lends itself for school or work lunches, eaten straight from the fridge as leftovers or prepared ahead of time for every day dinners, dinner parties or picnic lunches.

Ingredients:

2 large or 4 small potatoes (approx 500 grams)
8 eggs
1-2 tablespoons cream (optional)
1 black pudding (blood sausage) or chorizo, sliced into thin rounds (approx 150g), (optional)
1 large red onion, sliced (or brown onion if red not available)
12 (approx) cherry tomatoes, cut in half (or ½ large tomato, diced)
handful of parsley, chopped
unrefined salt
cracked pepper
1 tablespoon tallow
1 tablespoon butter (or fat of choice)

Directions:

 Preheat grill on high. Thinly slice potatoes and steam until soft (approx 10-12 minutes).

Melt tallow in small frying pan on low heat. Cook the black pudding on each side until browned (or cook underside on the stove top then transfer to the oven under a heated grill element to cook the top side). Leave in steamer until ready to use.

Meanwhile melt the butter in a large frying pan on low heat. Add the onions and sauté until golden brown stirring occasionally. Take approximately half of the onions out and set aside. Add the cooked sliced potatoes, and place the onions and parsley on top.

Blend eggs (and cream) with stick blender until well mixed. Pour egg mixture into the frying pan on top of the potato mixture. Scatter the cooked black pudding/chorizo and cherry tomatoes into the mixture. Season with salt and pepper.

Cook the underside of the omelette on the stove top before transferring to the oven under a heated grill element to cook the top side until golden. Once the top side is golden brown take out from the grill and if the eggs still haven’t set (test by tilting the frying pan to see if the eggs are still runny) then place back on the stove top on very low heat and cook until the mixture is set.

Keeps in refrigerator for a couple days.

Serves 4 as a main or 8 as a side.

Note: I tend not to peel the skin on potatoes unless they are particularly grubby / full of soil. This typically depends on the variety of the potato. Sometimes a little scrub with a brush and filtered water is enough to remove excess dirt.

Variations:

Instead of cooking this in a frying pan you could all the ingredients in a greased oven-proof baking dish and bake in the oven at 120 degrees Celsius for 1 hour or until set.